Since Oregon Forests Forever started in 2018, we’ve grown to a community of over 60,000 Oregonians. As we’ve grown, we’ve gotten a lot of questions – from what kind of tree species foresters plant, to what we can do about the wildfire crisis; our community is listening and curious – and for good reason. We’re thankful for this growing group of engaged advocates, and we’re doing what we can to get factual information in your hands.  

We appreciate that not everyone has a degree in forestry or wildlife biology, so we started seeking out professionals who work in the field to answer some of the most common questions our community asks. 

Here are their answers. 

Have a question you’d like us to answer? Send us an email: info@oregonforestsforever.com

Are farms really forests?

Do you only plant Douglas-fir?

Why do you clear-cut instead of thin?

Does deforestation happen in Oregon?

Is the increase in wildfire due to poor forest management or climate change?

Is building with wood carbon smart?

Should we just learn to live with wildfire?

Does planting 3 trees for every one we harvest contribute to wildfire fuel?

Are trees cut down to make toilet paper?

Is all of Oregon’s old-growth forest gone?

What’s the difference between Christmas tree seedlings and reforestation seedlings?

What is a working forest?

When and why do you thin a forest?

We’re focused on actively and sustainably managing our forests in Oregon.

© 2024 Oregon Forests Forever All rights reserved.

Wildfire Prevention

Protecting human lives, property, and timber-producing forest

Cold Clean Water

Oregon’s forests produce the highest quality water in the state

Recreation

Supporting communities and the environment

Carbon Solutions and Climate Change

Working forests are key in the fight against climate change

Community Jobs

Offering a career path and future for everyone

Professional Forest Management

Forest practice laws safeguard water, fish and wildlife

Wildlife in Managed Forests

Different forest types create and maintain wildlife habitats

Renewable Building Materials

Oregon has the same amount of forestland now as 100 years ago